Boeing Aircraft Configuration

INTRODUCTION

The Boeing 737 airplane is a two-engine aircraft designed primarily for short to medium range operation. The use of extremely effective “high-lift” devices on the wing trailing edges and leading edges provides an airplane which cruises at speeds comparable to other high-speed jet aircraft. The 737, therefore, operates with equal comfort and safety from airfields with long runways and from the shorter runways formerly used only by the piston airplanes.

BOEING 737-300 AT A GLANCE

Engines 2
Range of flight 1,899 miles
Maximum speed 575 m.p.h.
Seating capacity 138
Maximum altitude 37,000 feet
Crew 5

AIRCRAFT COMPONENTS

The five major components of the Boeing 737 are:

Engine
Wing
Tail section
Fuselage
Landing gear
Engine

The main function of the engine is to provide “thrust”.

Wing

The main function of the wing is to provide “lift”. The wing span of the Boeing 737-300 aircraft is approximately 94 feet.

Tail Section

The tail section provides aircraft stability and control.

Fuselage

The fuselage is the main structure or “body” of the aircraft. It is comprised of the following:

Flight deck

The flight deck is where all flight control instruments are located. The flight deck is entered from the forward entry area through an outward opening door. The door is designed with two (2) lower inside break-away parcels and a one-way viewer which allows the flight attendants to scan the customer cabin area. An electric lock controlled by the pilots secures the door during flight. In the event the door cannot be unlocked from inside the flight deck, a flight deck key is located in the forward bulkhead.

The flight deck is also equipped with two (2) emergency exits; one sliding window aircraft left and one sliding window aircraft right. Both exits are plug type. The Captain’s sliding window (aircraft left) is the only exit on the Boeing 737 that cannot be opened from the outside.

Customer Compartment

Equipped with six (6) exits; one forward entry door, one forward galley door, two (2) overwing window exits, one aircraft left and one aircraft right (for emergency use only), one aft entry door, and one aft galley door. Entry doors are located aircraft left. Galley doors are located aircraft right.

Auxiliary Power Unit (APU)

The APU is a gas turbine engine mounted in the tail of the aircraft. This unit, along with the main engines, provide necessary electrical and hydraulic power cabin air conditioning and pressurization, and heat for wing anti-icing. It operates in the air and on the ground.

However, at engine start-up, all APU air power is used to start the engines. As a result of the pull of power used to start the engine, air conditioning/heating and electrical power temporarily ceases until engines have started. At that time, The APU can resume providing air conditioning/heating and cabin pressurization.

Luggage/Cargo Compartment

Two (2) cargo compartment doors, both plug type, are located on the lower right side of the fuselage. The doors can be operated gradually from either the inside or outside of the aircraft. A warning light in the flight deck illuminates when the doors are not closed and locked.

Landing Gear

The Boeing 737 landing gear, used for taxi, takeoff and landing operations, is a tricycle-type, retractable landing gear consisting of two (2) wheels on each gear.

Main Gear

Mounted under the aft portion of the wing, each wheel is fitted with brakes.

Nose Gear

Located just forward of the main entry door: nose gear is steerable to provide ground maneuverability; wheels are not fitted with brakes.

Doors and Windows

Entry and Galley Service Doors

Inward-outward opening plug-type pressure doors are used for all entry doors and galley service doors. This type door operates on two hinges and uses four roller-type latches for positioning and locking. A light In the control panel will indicate when any door is not locked. Each door has a squall three-pane window.

The doors may be opened from either inside or outside the airplane. The interior door handle rotates easily through a 180 degree arc. The exterior door handle is recessed in the outer face of the door and must be pulled out before it can be rotated. Door opening training is one of the major physical training conducted during their flight attendant training program.

To open the door, movement of either handle rotates a mechanism within the door. This mechanism mechanically lowers the pressure gates at the bottom and top of the door, moves the door into the cabin and then rotates it through its opening to about 45 degrees. From this position, the door is pushed or pulled to the full open position against the airplane fuselage. The door is held in the open position by a mechanical latch on the upper hinge.

To close any of the aircraft doors, the mechanical latch on the upper hinge, referred to as “gust lock”, must be depressed. The door is then manually rotated to the aforementioned 45 degree position. From this position, the handle is used to position, close and latch the door. When the handle is rotated to the full closed position, the pressure gates close, sealing the door. Because of cabin pressure loads, these doors cannot be opened during normal flight conditions.

Escape Slides

An escape slide is mounted to the inside of each door to be used in an emergency situation for the evacuation of customers and crew.

A pressure gauge on each slide provides a means to ensure the slide is operational.

All slides are designed to inflate automatically when deployed; however, in the case of a malfunction, a red inflation handle will be present as a backup system and may be pulled to manually inflate the slide.

On the slides of some aircraft, there is a quick release handle used to detach the slide from the airplane in the event of a water evacuation. This handle which is protected by a cover marked “for ditching” becomes visible once the slide is deployed. On any other aircraft which do not have a quick release handle, the deployed slide may be detached from the airplane by removing the girt bar from the door brackets.

Windows

Rectangular customer cabin windows 10 x14 inches, are located at eye level and are spaced at 20 inch intervals. Each window consists of two panes, each of which being capable to withstanding the full pressure load of the cabin. In addition, a decorative window panel covers each window area to provide protection for the window. Each panel contains opaque sliding window shade eliminating the need for sidewall curtains. The shades slide up to open. Small circular windows are also provided on all entry and galley service doors.

Overwing Window Exits

All 737-300 Series aircraft are equipped with two overwing window exits; one aircraft left and one aircraft right. The exits are marked with an exit sign located on the customer cabin ceiling and an exit sign at each over-wing window exit approximately two feet above door level. These exits are to be opened only during an emergency evacuation. They may be opened from the inside by pulling down on the top hand hold/release handle.

For ease in viewing outside conditions, a rectangular window and sliding shade, similar to the customer cabin windows, is located at eye level on each over-wing window exit. Due to the evacuation mechanism in the exit however, the window shades slide down to open rather than up.

CABIN INTERIOR COMPONENTS

Familiarising with the cabin interior components is also one of the major topics of any flight attendant training program.

Galleys

Galley units are installed on all Boeing 737 aircraft: one forward and one aft. Galleys are stocked with the items necessary to provide a complete infight service. In addition, each galley is equipped with an electrical panel containing circuit breakers for various lighting systems and ovens (if applicable). The following are examples of one type of galley, others will be similar.

Lavatories

Lavatories are provided on all Boeing 737 aircraft. Each lav is equipped with a flushing toilet, a wash basin with hot and cold water, outlet’s for electric shavers, a fluorescent lighted mirror, a customer call button and information sign, a lavatory service unit, and all necessary toiletry supplies.

Lavatory Door

The door to each lavatory has a slide type door lock which is operated from inside the lav. A small sign on the outside of the door will indicate either occupied or vacant, depending on the position of the lock. Locking the door will also illuminate a “lav occupied” light on the lower ceiling in the respective cabin area. Although the lock is operated from the inside, if necessary, the door may be unlocked from the outside by inserting a sharp tipped object into the pinhole on the “occupied” sign and sliding it to the “vacant” position. Also, part of the lav door is an externally mounted ashtray.

Toilets

The stainless steel toilets are self-contained units serviced from outside the aircraft. Each lavatory has an independent waste system. The toilet waste is stored in a toilet tank in each lavatory. A separator between the tank and toilet bowl prevents customers from seeing into the tank and liquid in the tank from slashing up into the bowl. The flush handle initiates a cycle in which a chemical-flushing liquid containing dye, disinfectant and deodorant, flows into the bowl from a rotating pump and filtering unit. During ground servicing, the toilet tanks are darned and rinsed, and a chemical liquid is added.

Hot and cold water in each lavatory is provided at a stainless steel sink. The water heater for each lav maintains a temperature of approximately 125 degrees F to 133 degrees F. After ground servicing, a new water charge will be heated within 4 minutes.

Trash Compartments

Adjacent to the stainless steel sink is a trash chute with a spring loaded flap door and a removable trash can located under the sink. It is essential that this spring loaded floor remain “operative” at all times. Periodic checks by flight crewmembers should be conducted to ensure proper operation.

Customer Call Button and Information Sign

Located near each lavatory on a panel near the sink is a Flight Attendant call button and a “Return to Seat” customer information sign.

Use of the call button will notify the Flight Attendants that assistance is needed in the lavatory.

Illumination of the lavatory “Return to Seat” sign is notification that the Captain has turned on the “Fasten Seat Belt” sign in the cabin. This sign will remain illuminated until the cabin “Fasten Seat Belt” sign has been turned off.

Also located on the panel is the electric shaver outlet and a razor blade disposal. An air vent outlet is located on the sidewall, just above and to the left of the panel.

Smoke Detector

Each lavatory is equipped with a smoke detector which is designed to alert crewmembers to the presence of fire. Upon indication, crewmembers should follow prescribed fire fighting procedures.

Fire Extinguisher

Each lavatory is equipped with an automatic fire extinguisher. This extinguisher is designed to combat fires that originate in the waste receptacles and sink area.

Required Placard

A sign or placard must be visible in each lavatory that reads Federal law provides for a penalty for up to $2,000 for tampering with the smoke detector installed in this lavatory.

Supplies

Compartments are provided for paper towels, bar soap, Kleenex, sanitary napkins, seat covers, air sickness bags, and toilet paper. A stowage compartment behind the toilet may be used for extra lavatory supplies.

Water System

The customer water system is supplied from a pressurized tank located aft of the aft cargo compartment. The water flows by pressure to each lavatory and galley. Waste water is eliminated when the airlift is serviced.

Servicing

The water system is serviced from a panel located at the lower left side of the aircraft, aft of the aft cargo department.

System Pressure

The water system is pressurized by air taken from engine # 1 or the APU. This air is filtered, and pressure regulated to provide a constant flow rate in the water system.

Water Gauge

The water gauge is located over the aft galley door and indicates the amount of water in the tank. When the “PUSH” button on the indicator is pressed, a light will illuminate to show the water level. When full, approximately 30 U.S. gallons will be available. A shut-off valve is located in the cabinet below the sink in each lavatory. Normally, the drain shut-off valves will be ON and the vent valves closed.

Water Shut Off Valve

Located in the uppermost middle area of the forward and aft galleys, covered by a small panel, is an emergency water shut-off valve. This valve is to be used in the event of an uncontrollable water leak in the galley.

Also located in both forward and aft lavatories is a three (3) way shut of valve. This valve may read open/drain/off. In some lavatories the valve is not readily visible. If it is not, it will be located behind a flip latch door, behind the trash can, underneath the sink. If it is difficult to find simply follow the waterline from the sink drain and work backwards to the valve. The valve may also be located out in front, near the trash can, underneath the sink. Once again, the valve is to be used in the event of an uncontrollable water leak.

WATER HEATER LIGHT ILLUMINATED – Heater operating.

WATER HEATER SWITCH ON – Activates the water heater.

Overhead Bins

The overhead bins on each side of the cabin provides stowage for hats, coats, garment bags, briefcases, blankets, and pillows. Each bin is marked with a placard stating the maximum weight of the bin. Articles should not exceed weight limitations for the bin.

Customer Seating

Accommodations for 138 tourist-class customers are provided in the delivery configuration. For the most part, the seats will be arranged six-abreast at a typical seat spacing of 3 feet. All seats are equipped with tray tables. The tray tables are attached to and fold into the seat back.

The seats may be adjusted to a maximum recline position of 38 degrees. (Seats immediately forward and aft of partitions or bulkheads do not recline.) The recline button is located on the inner side of the inboard armrests.

The overhead bin assist step is located on the bottom forward edge of each aisle armrest.

In an emergency, the seat cushion may be removed and used as a flotation device.

There is a stowage pocket attached to the back of each seat which contains airsick bags, Safety Information Cards and an in-flight magazine.

Flight Attendant Jump seats

A self-folding Flight Attendant jump seat is located on the aft and forward-facing bulkhead beside the forward and aft entry doors. The jumpsuits are spring-loaded to the retract position and are fitted with seat belts and harnesses. FAA regulations mandate that each Flight Attendant jump seat automatically retract to a stowed position. The seat cushions may also be used as flotation devices. The forward Flight Attendant jump seat faces aft and the aft Flight Attendant jump seat faces forward. Both seats accommodate two persons.

Cabin Interior Systems

Passenger Service Unit (PSU)

Service units are provided throughout the airplane to supply cooling air, oxygen and electrical services for the customer’s and Flight Attendant’s use.

These units are fastened to the underside of the overhead bins, overhead and 4-5 inches forward of the seat backs. Each unit contains three air vent outlets, three reading lights with individual buttons, four oxygen masks, a passenger address speaker and one Flight Attendant call button. There are also “Fasten Seat Belt” and “No Smoking” signs located on the aft face of all units.

Customer Signs

Signs indicating “No Smoking” and “Fasten Seat Belt” conditions are located in the PSU’s which insure visibility to all customers. Although the “No Smoking” and “Fasten Seat Belt” signs are contained in one unit, they function independently of each other. A “Return to Seat” indicator is in each lavatory and is visible only when the sign is on. The signs are controlled in the flight deck either manually or automatically. If the Captain selects automatic control, all signs will be on when the landing gear is down.

The “Fasten Seat Belt” and “Return to Seat” signs go off when the wing flaps are fully retracted. During the landing sequence, the “Fasten Seat Belt” and “Return to Seat” signs come on when the flaps are lowered or the landing gear is down. A single low-tone chime sounds over the customer address loudspeaker system each time the signs come on or go off. The “No Smoking Sign” stays illuminated during night and while on the ground. (Cross reference FA.R.s 121.317)

The oxygen masks drop automatically at a cabin altitude of 14,000 feet or may be dropped manually by inserting a pen or small stick into the “pin hole” located at the edge of the compartment.

To manually deploy oxygen masks, the “pin hole” is located in the middle of the PSU.

If no “pin hole” is present, insert an object into the edge of the compartment itself nearest the Flight Attendant call button.

In the 300 series aircraft, all PSU oxygen masks are connected to a single release lanyard. Pulling down on any mask releases the lanyard and all masks come down. The 02 generator in that PSU is activated supplying 02 to the PSU masks. 02 is generated through the line for approximately 12 minutes and can not be shut off once the generator is activated.

Lavatory units

Recessed In the ceiling of each lavatory is a compartment containing two oxygen masks. As in the other Passenger Service Units, these masks will drop from their container when the oxygen system is activated. The masks may be dropped manually by depressing “pin hole” in the compartment door. 02 will flow through the line for approximately 12 minutes.

Flight Attendant Units

These units contain two oxygen masks and are recessed in the cabin ceiling above the forward and aft Flight Attendant jump seats. 02 will flow through the line for approximately 12 minutes.

Flight deck Units

As previously stated, The flight deck has a completely separate oxygen system. It is a gaseous, dilute-demand system with four (4) individual masks and regulators for each flight deck crewmember. During the preflight check, the flight deck will switch the oxygen regulator to the 100% position.

FIGHT ATTENDANT CONTROL PANELS

There are two Flight Attendant control panels on all 737 aircraft.

On the 300 series aircraft, the panel is healed directly across from the Flight Attendant jump seat.

Cabin Lighting Control

Located on the forward Flight Attendant control panel are the controls for the cabin entry, ceiling, and window lights and a switch for the forward Flight Attendant work light. The aft Flight Attendant work light and aft entry lights are controlled from the aft control panel. Some controls may also have a setting marked night.

The Aft Attendant Control Panel

Located adjacent to the Flight Attendant jump seat, aircraft left on all series.

Both Flight Attendant control panels contain a public address (P.A.) hand-held microphone, a crew interphone, and the “call system” controls. In addition, the forward panel is equipped with the cabin lighting controls, while the aft panel contains the emergency light switch.

Emergency Light Switch

The emergency light switch, located on the Aft Flight Attendant control panel, is to be activated in case all electrical power is lost. It is important to note that a red cover protects the switch and must be lifted before the emergency lights can be turned on.

Interphone

The crew interphone is a handset with a push-to-talk, push-to-listen button to be used for Flight Attendant to Flight Attendant or pilot to Flight Attendant communication. The call buttons are used in conjunction as a signal to answer the interphone.

P.A. (Public Address System)

Announcements to the cabin are made via the public address system by utilizing the handheld push-to-talk type microphone. An automatic priority system sets the pilot’s microphone for first priority.

Call System Controls

The call system controls, located on both the forward and aft control panel, include a Captain, Fight Attendant and Reset button.

In the customer cabin, there are two (2) different types of call lights secured to the forward and aft lowered ceilings. They are used for communication between the flight deck and the cabin or customer and lav to cabin.

Customer Call to Flight Attendant

The Flight Attendant call button is located on the underside of each passenger service unit. To call a Flight Attendant, the customer pushes the call button which illuminates the button in the PSU and the blue master call light located overhead in the forward and/or aft lowered ceiling. A one-toned chime sounds over the public address system. Customer to Flight Attendant calls are cancelled by pressing the button on the customer service unit. The blue call light will be extinguished when all buttons are reset.

Lavatory Call to Flight Attendant

The occupant of the lavatory can call a Flight Attendant by depressing the Flight Attendant call button in the lavatory. A high one-toned chime will sound in the cabin and an amber light will illuminate on the master call unit. The amber light will remain illuminated until the call button has been reset.

On some 300 series aircraft, the reset button is located in the lavatory. Some others have the reset button located on the bulkhead above the Flight Attendant jump seat, outside the lavatory door.

Captain Call to Flight Attendant

A pilot to Flight Attendant call illuminates the pink master call lights in the forward and aft lowered ceiling and on two-toned chime sound over the public address system. The lights remain on until the reset button is depressed at the Flight Attendant’s panel.

Flight Attendant Call to Captain

A Flight Attendant to Captain call is made by pushing the Captain’s call button at any Flight Attendant Control Panel. Pressing this button sounds a one-toned chime in the flight deck and illuminates a blue (Flight Attendant) light on the pilots overhead panel. The blue call light remains on only while the button on the Flight Attendant Control panel is depressed. The Flight Attendant may talk to the crew on the forward or aft handsets.

Flight Attendant Call to Flight Attendant

A Flight Attendant to Flight Attendant call is made by depressing the Flight Attendant call button on the Flight Attendant Control Panel. The pink master call light on the forward and aft lowered ceiling illuminate, and a two-toned chime sounds on the customer address system. The light remains on until the reset button is pressed at either Flight Attendant Control Panels. The Flight Attendants may talk to one another on the handset by depressing the push-to-talk button.

Lighting

Customer Cabin Lighting

General illumination of the customer cabin is provided by florescent lights in each overhead ceiling panel and above the upper portion of each window panel.

The fluorescent ceiling and window light intensity may be selected as either BRIGHT or DIM. In addition to the fluorescent lights, incandescent night lights are located in the ceiling area to provide a low level of illumination for night flights. All cabin window and ceiling lights are controlled from the forward Flight Attendant’s panel.

If external power is connected to the airplane but is not being used by the pilots, a switch on the forward Flight Attendant’s panel remarked “ground service” may be used to provide a power source for cabin lighting.

Entry Lights

The forward and aft entry areas are illuminated for boarding and departing by incandescent and florescent lights in the ceiling, and a threshold light near the door. A switch for the entry light is located on the respective Flight Attendants panel. Each switch has three positions: OFF, DIM and BRIGHT. Light illuminates the threshold when the respective entry light switch is in the BRIGHT position. The entry lights provide dim illumination when ground power is connected regardless of switch position.

Lavatory Lights

Lavatory lighting consists of one florescent mirror light and one dome light in each lavatory. The dome light will be on any time power is on in the airplane. The florescent light is controlled by a micro switch in the door latch. When the door latch is closed, the light will illuminate. When the airplane is on the ground, using external power, the florescent light will be on regardless of door position.

Exit Lights

In addition to the normal illumination, exit lights are provided in the forward and aft lowered ceiling, above each entry and galley door, and over each of the exit. In addition, lighting on or near the aisle door ensure illumination of the customer escape path. These lights are normally off and will illuminate if a loss of airplane power occurs or when the emergency light switch is activated. These lights are powered by self-contained batteries.

Galley Lights

Galley lighting for the forward or aft galley is provided by either florescent or incandescent lights beside or above the work area, these are controlled by a switch usually located beside the circuit breaker on the galley. Some aft galleys have additional lighting in the ceiling overhead. This is controlled by a switch beside the water gauge indicator pressurization galley door.

Air Conditioning and Pressurization

Normally, the air which is used for air conditioning and pressurization is supplied by the engines. The auxiliary power unit can also be used to supply air. Air entering the engines or APU is compressed to a high level before it is mixed with fuel and ignited. During compression, the temperature is controlled either automatically or manually by controls on the pilot’s overhead panel.

Distribution

Air flows into the customer cabin through two completely separate compartments.

Conditioned air enters the cabin by way of sidewall ducts to a slotted overhead duct running 70% of the cabin. Part of this air enters the cabin through grills in the light fixtures at either end of the overhead duct.

Air also enters the cabin through individually controlled outlets in the customer service units and in the lavatories. This air is taken from the cold air side of the air conditioning system and is always colder than the main cabin temperature.

Air exits the cabin through floor level grills in the cabin sidewalls and through vents in the galleys and lavatories. As the air leaves the main cabin, it is routed around the cargo compartments to heat them and out the outflow valves. This process completely exchanges cabin air with outside, fresh air, every 2-3 minutes in all of our aircraft.

Air stairs (if applicable)

Forward Air stairs

The air stairs provide ground access for customer boarding and deplaning. The stairs are cased in the body of the airplane directly under the forward entry door and may be operated from either the inside or outside control panel. (Aircraft may or may not be outfitted with an air stair unit.)

Air stair Operation

The interior control panel is located above and to the left of the forward entry door. Operation of the stairs from this position requires that the entry door be opened far enough to provide good visibility of the area below. The open door also releases the air stairs door back pin. This lock pin prevents inadvertent operation of the air stairs while in-flight.

CAUTION: AIR STAIR SHOULD NOT BE OPERATED more FREQUENTLY THAN THREE CONSECUTIVE CYCLES OF NORMAL SYSTEM OPERATION WITHIN A 20 MINUTE PERIOD. AIR STAIR SHOULD NOT BE OPERATED IF WINDS EXCEED 40 KNOTS.

A. Normal Operation WARNING: WHEN OPERATING AIR STAIRS FROM INTERIOR CONTROL PANEL, OPEN ENTRY DOOR TO COCKED POSITION TO ALLOW CLEAR VISIBILITY OF AREA OUTSIDE AIRPLANE TO PREVENT INJURY TO PERSONNEL. DO NOT OPEN DOOR BEYOND COCKED POSITION WHILE OPERATING AIR STAIR OR EQUIPMENT MAY BE DAMAGED.

1. To Extend:
a. Crack door at least six inches.

CAUTION: DO NOT RELEASE AIR STAIR CONTROL SWITCH UNTIL STAIRS OPERATING LIGHT IS EXTINGUISHED. RELEASING THE AIR STAIR CONTROL SWITCH BEFORE STAIR EXTENSION IS COMPLETE COULD RESULT IN JAMMING OF THE STAIRS AND STRUCTURAL DAMAGE.

b. Move the “NORMAL” control switch in the “EXTEND” position until the STAIRS OPERATING light goes out.

NOTE: The forward air stair control panel is located above the forward entry door.

c. Pull the upper handrail from the stairs and connect it to fittings inside the aircraft door. The stairs are ready for use.

2. To retract:
a. Disconnect the handrails from their extend fittings and stow them in the handrails ensuring they are in a locked position.

NOTE: DO NOT RELEASE AIR STAIR CONTROL SWITCH UNTIL STAIRS OPERATING LIGHT IS EXTINGUISHED. RELEASING THE AIR STAIR CONTROL SWITCH before STAIR RETRACTION IS COMPLETE COULD RESULT IN JAMMING OF THE STAIRS AND STRUCTURAL DAMAGE.

b. Move the “NORMAL” control switch in the “RETRACT” position until the STAIRS OPERATING light goes out.
c. Close the forward entry door.

B. Standby Operation
1. Flight Attendants are required to request permission from the Captain to use the stand by system for air stairs.

WARNING: WHEN OPERATING AIR STAIRS FROM INTERIOR CONTROL PANEL OPEN ENTRY DOOR TO COCKED POSITION TO ALLOW CLEAR VISIBILITY OF AREA OUTSIDE AIRPLANE TO PREVENT INJURY TO PERSONNEL. DO NOT OPEN DOOR BEYOND COCKED POSITION WHILE OPERATING AIR STAIR OR EQUIPMENT MAY BE DAMAGED.

2. To extend:
a. Crack door at least six inches.
b. The Captain will ensure that the battery switch is in the ON position before standby operation.

CAUTION: DO NOT RELEASE AIR STAIR CONTROL SWITCH UNTIL STAIRS OPERATING LIGHT IS EXTINGUISHED. RELEASING THE AIR STAIR CONTROL SWITCH BEFORE STAIR EXTENSION IS COMPLETE COULD RESULT IN JAMMING OF THE STAIRS AND STRUCTURAL DAMAGE.

c. Move switch guard to operate standby switch. Move the “STANDBY” control switch in the “STANDBY” position until the

STAIRS OPERATING light goes out.

NOTE: The standby switch is located in the air stair control panel over the forward entry door.

d. Pull the upper handrails from the stairs and connect to fittings inside the aircraft floor. The stairs are ready for use.

3. To retract

CAUTION: IN STANDBY OPERATIONS, SAFETY SWITCHES ARE BYPASSED. FAILURE TO PROPERLY STOW HANDRAILS MAY RESULT IN DAMAGE TO THE AIR STAIR AND/OR AIRCRAFT STRUCTURE.

a. Disconnect the handrails from their extend fittings and stow them in the handrails ensuring they are in a locked position.
b. The Captain will ensure that the handrail extensions are properly stowed and the battery switch is in the ON position before standby operation.

CAUTION: DO NOT RELEASE AIR STAIR CONTROL SWITCH UNTIL STAIRS OPERATION LIGHT IS EXTINGUISHED. RELEASING THE AIR STAIR CONTROL SWITCH BEFORE STAIR RETRACTION IS COMPLETE COULD RESULT IN JAMMING OF THE Stairs AND STRUCTURAL DAMAGE.

c. Move switch guard to the left and position the “STANDBY” control switch in the “RETRACT” position until the STAIRS OPERATING light goes out.

NOTE: The standby switch is located in the forward air stair control panel over the forward entry door.

e. Close the forward entry door.

AIRCRAFT DIFFERENCES

Certain aircraft in our fleet house variations from what is considered “standard” configuration and structure as outlined in the FAM and Initial Training Program. Each cabin crew member is responsible to be aware of the differences that may be present on any one particular aircraft. A complete preflight check of the aircraft should be conducted to ensure that every crew member has knowledge of these variations. A detailed chart, identifying each aircraft tail (registration) number and associated differences, is found immediately following this section. The following differences may be present on any one particular aircraft. Emergency Equipment and Procedures are identified with an (*):

Forward Galley

A closet may be located nearest the forward entry door. The closet is part of a bulkhead that divides the jump seat from the general cabin area. This closet is primary used for crew luggage. The floor contents of the closet must not exceed 100 lbs. and must only consist of soft-sided articles. Likewise, contents hanging from the installed rod must be soft sided and not exceed 120 lbs.
A bulkhead may not be present at the forward entry door. In this instance, there is no physical separation between row 1 A/C left and the primary boarding door. Thus, row 1 A1/C left must be considered an Emergency Exit Row and the “A” Flight Attendant should ensure the selection criteria is met and verbally confirm ability with each passenger.
Crew life vests may be located behind the actual jump seat itself and not accessible through top stowage type compartments. In this case, the jump seat must be physically removed from the wall in order to preflight or retrieve each vest. The jump seat is secured to the wall by Velcro straps and must be properly fitted to the wall after each preflight inspection. Other aircraft jump seats are equipped with an underside compartment that houses each associated life vest. In this case, the compartment must be manually opened to preflight or retrieve the life vest (*).
The jump seat lap belt and shoulder harness may not be permanently attached together and must be manually secured. Each shoulder harness is fitted with a metal attachment point that slides onto the lap belt prior to being secured. All shoulder harnesses and lap belts should be fastened so that the buckles are secured low across the hips.
The galley may be equipped with either one or two coffee makers.
Reset procedures for lavatory smoke detectors vary. Some detectors have a “reset button” that can either be pressed or rotated to silence the alarm and reset the detector. Other detectors must have a pen, pencil, or pin inserted into an “inlet” hole to reset the detector. (*)
Boarding music may be available at the forward control panel.
Cabin crew chimes may consist of either single tone or dual tone chimes.
A forward air stair control panel may be located above the forward entry door and the aircraft may or may not be outfitted with airstrips.
Cabin

Smoke locator buttons may be present below the overhead bins at the overwing area. These buttons allow a person to locate the overwing exit area in a cabin that is consumed with smoke. If present, the buttons may consist of a single raised button, or a series of two or more aligned raised buttons. No preflight inspection of these buttons is necessary.
Exit signs that are secured to the central ceiling may consist of a single sign or dual sign. Regardless of number, each sign must be identified during the Emergency Briefing prior to flight. (*)
There may not be a divider between secured PBES and the open space in a particular overhead bin. Care should be taken to ensure that no single article restricts the availability of PBE retrieval. (*)
Row 12 may be the designated overwing exit emergency row on some aircraft instead of row 11.
On certain aircraft that are configured with 136 seats rather than 138, the seats deemed emergency exit row seats may include the two at the window exit as well as the seat immediately behind the window exit if it has direct access to the window hatch.
The Passenger Service Units may not contain gasped vents. On such aircraft, the ventilation system can not be independently controlled by the passenger.
Aft Galley

The number and location of galley units in the aft of the aircraft vary. Any one particular aircraft may be designed with a single a/c right “half galley”, a “lull galley” located on both a/c right and left, or a transverse galley that spans the entire width of the aft service area and faces forward.
The standard forward facing double jump seat may be replaced by two aft facing single jump seats. In this case, one jump seat is located on a/c left, the other a/c right. The “B” Flight Attendant must always be seated in the jump seats closest to the aft entry door. While assuming the brace position, each aft facing Flight Attendant should ensure that his or her head is positioned against the jump seat/bulkhead. (*)
The aircraft may be outfitted with more than the standard number of jump seats. If the aircraft is equipped to seat more than four Flight Attendants, the additional f/a jump seats may not be occupied.
The aft galley may contain one or two coffee makers.
There may be a trash container located in the aft closet. If present, the fire extinguisher located above the container must be secure and in proper working order for the container to be used during flight. The extinguisher gauge needle must be within the green band. Caution should be taken during the servicing of this container to ensure that the extinguisher is left secured to the closet ceiling. (*)
One or two lavatories may be located in the aft section of the aircraft. If two lavatories are present, they may either be positioned aft of the galley area or aft of row 23, forward of the galley.
A viewing mirror may be located above the aft galley. The viewing mirror allows aft facing Flight Attendants to view and monitor the passenger cabin. The “C” Flight Attendant must preflight the mirror to ensure that it is secure.
Life vest locations: see FORWARD GALLEY (*)
Seat Belt: see FORWARD GALLEY
Lavatory Smoke Detector Reset: see FORWARD GALLEY (*)

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